Saturday, March 10, 2018

What Can Chile's Military Expect from Piñera 2.0?

Sebastian Piñera takes office Sunday after being elected president for a second non-consecutive term. The center-right Piñera has broad plans for the military, but little in terms of weapons modernization. Instead, his platform calls for administrative and organizational changes, such as beefing up cyberdefense, updating the management of state-owned defense companies and maintaining alliances with friendly nations. But there are a few noteworthy goals. One is to increase transparency in the armed forces, which is almost an obligatory task after scandals surfaced in the past year. Piñera also seeks changes in the military service to improve the call-up of reserves in case of emergency, which in Chile primarily means assisting with natural disasters. Another key goal is replacing the tax on government-owned Codelco with a new financing mechanism for weapons acquisitions. The mining company can use more capital to modernize and the 10% tax is a drag. However, three previous administrations (including Piñera's first term) have failed to move forward on those plans. The so-called copper law seems as entrenched as empanadas on Independence Day. The Harvard-trained Piñera's larger security issues are internal, namely the indigenous uprising in the south of Chile, border security and everyday crime and the ills associated with it, such as recidivism and organized crime. Piñera has sort of a clean slate to start with. He's named a longtime senator as his minister of defense, and a new general has just assumed the leadership of the Army.

1 comment:

Michel Babun said...

There are mainly three branches of the military- Army, Navy, and Air forces. The activities of these three branches are different. But at one point the activities of these three branches are same. This is the security of the state or its citizens. US military bases